• Brian Cohn

    My HR partners were always a tremendous sounding board as we developed a fair, balanced scorecard. It’s always good to have someone ask why we chose this or that, or have we thought about another.

    Brian Erik Cohn
    http://www.erikco.com

    • Carol MacDonald Anderson

      Those are the questions HR needs to ask….thanks for the comment Brian

  • Roger Plachy

    There is nothing more basic than knowing the result we want to accomplish.
    Roger Plachy
    http://www.JobDescriptionsbyJRMI.com

    • Carol MacDonald Anderson

      Agree Roger, but why do we so often forget the basics?

      • Roger Plachy

        We’re not encouraged to look at the big picture. We’re led to look at life as a series of little observations.
        Roger Plachy
        http:www.JobDescriptionsbyJRMI.com

        • Carol MacDonald Anderson

          That’s true, Roger. But that’s where diversity in thinking comes into play. Many of us look at the 30,000 foot vision and others see the details. We need each other.

  • steventhunt

    Great points! It is interesting (and refreshing) that it is very similar to points made in my new book Common Sense Talent Management http://www.amazon.com/Common-Sense-Talent-Management-Performance/dp/0470442417/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1387826073&sr=8-1&keywords=common+sense+talent+managemen

    Here’s a relevant excerpt:
    “The main challenge to performance management is it is expected to do many different things that do not always align well with one another. Performance
    management programs often mix multiple, conflicting objectives related to
    coaching, evaluation, compensation, staffing and development together into a
    single process. This can lead to processes that don’t do any one of those
    things particularly well, except giving employees and managers something they
    can all complain about. A key to designing effective performance management processes is to clarify exactly what the process is expected to accomplish.
    Only then can you make appropriate design decisions to ensure that your performance management process does what it is intended to do.

    Once you’ve decided the focus, you will be a position to effectively answer the following critical design questions, which the rest of this chapter explores in detail.
    1. What are the primary objectives of your performance management process?
    2. How do you define effective performance?
    3. When will you evaluate performance?
    4. How will you evaluate performance?
    5. How will you calibrate performance evaluations?
    6. How is data from performance evaluations used for pay, staffing, development, and workforce management?
    7. What training and incentives do managers and employees need to effectively utilize performance management processes?”

    • Carol MacDonald Anderson

      Good points, Steven. It’s about the questions, not the answers.

  • Tarik Taman

    Carol, as always great, though-provoking stuff from the voice of experience. I agree that too often HR begins with “what?”, leading to performance management that is process-driven rather than business-focused. So yes, “why?” is the big question, and I would add a third, which you allude to: “who?” Who is going to be responsible for this? Which executives, which managers? And who will deal with sub-optimal performance?

    • Carol MacDonald Anderson

      Great point, Tarik. The “who” leads to accountability! Thanks for your comment.