Ask Barb

I would like to thank Paul Hawkinson for suggesting this column to answer “YOUR QUESTIONS.” Please send any additional questions to:

barb@staffingandrecruiting.com and put Fordyce in the subject line.

Q. How do I prevent my candidates from always expecting the top of the salary range? SL – Kansas City, MO

A. My first question to you … Why do they “know” the top of the range? It’s human nature to want all you can get. The best way to prevent this is NEVER quote a salary range when you are recruiting. Candidates will only hear the TOP of the range. To attract top talent you CAN say the salary range is very “competitive” and then ask what the prospective recruit is currently earning. Reveal the salary is definitely within their range, but explain you never know what a job will pay – it depends on how well they interview! Follow up with: “If clients feel you need no training and can hit the ground running, money can go up. My guarantee to you is I will only send you on opportunities that represent a step up for you!”

Q. I sent a resume to a company two months ago and the resume was screened. I just found out my candidate is working for that same company, but in a different position. How can I prevent this from happening? FB – Cleveland, OH

A. Depending on the circumstances you may be owed a Fee. You need to have your lawyer research the “BUT FOR” rebuttal … “BUT FOR” you sending that resume, would they have this person’s resume? You need to stop sending out resumes with complete contact information . Placements are made behind your back more than you think. SUGGESTION: Have your receptionist call every company where you have booked send-outs, six months after your send-outs occur and ask for your candidate. Most of you will uncover at “least” one placement per quarter.

Send blind resumes (no name or contact information) or a fact sheet just showing where your candidate meets the minimum skills stated on your job order, until you have an established working relationship with your clients, based on trust. Also, make sure your name and contact information is on all pages on your resumes.

Q. Many of my candidates have an “entitlement” attitude and the questions they ask during the interview destroy any possibility of an offer. How do you prevent your candidates from asking such self-serving questions? CR, Sarasota, FL

A. There is only ONE WAY to prevent these questions. It is a proper PREP which is a vital step in the placement Process. You inform your candidate that you have inside information that can provide them a competitive edge. You set up a time when you can role play with your candidate for thirty minutes. The first fifteen minutes is going through each responsibility and making sure there is a high level of interest in accepting this position. You then role play the interview and questions are part of that process. Ask your candidate to prepare at least three questions they plan to ask. If there is no preparation, questions WILL focus on the WIIFM (what’s in it for me) of your candidate. Let them know when they ask questions, it is a great time to reveal the priorities of the person interviewing them. It greatly increases their chances of getting an offer. Role play the questions they plan to ask, prior to the interview. It is your job as their agent to answer all salary and benefit questions. If your candidate realizes WIIFM to ask appropriate questions, the self-serving questions don’t occur.