These Are the Obstacles for African-Americans in the U.S. Government

eeocFederal agencies in the U.S. tend to recruit people from colleges with relatively low black populations. That’s one of the obstacles hindering African-Americans in the federal workforce, according to a new study from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Among the other issues, according to the report:

  • A lack of mentors and networking opportunities for senior management jobs.
  • Laws and regulations that aren’t enforced.
  • Unconscious biases and perceptions.
  • A lack of training; for example, fewer opportunities to be an “acting supervisor.”

The report, and recommendations for addressing the obstacles, are here.

 

  • http://www.prodivnet.com Tim Graves

    Just wanted to drop a note about the great article. It seems so common sense but people just don’t get it, especially in government. I should know, I was in that purgatory for the previous 3 years before I came here. I was just on a panel at an SMA event here in Chicago yesterday, and had similar conversations with over 65 recruiters and staffing professionals about veterans (my area of specialty). First, I was the only vet on the panel, and second I was awestruck by how complicated people wanted to make it.

    I guess since I work in the diversity space, it’s easy to forget that not everyone gets it. My boss calls it the 10/10/80 rule. 10% that get it. 10% that do it because Uncle Sam says they have to. 80% are trying to figure it out. Thanks for helping some of the 80% to figure it out. Like we said in the Navy, it ain’t rocket surgery.

    I invite you to check out my organization and what we are doing to help them figure it out as well. Our African-American professional networking site, AMightyRiver.com was responsible for supplying the Department of State a majority of their African American candidates last year, so you may find it relevant.

  • http://hrthebottomline.blogspot.com/ Nancy Robin Gillman, MBA, SPHR

    I think we could write the same article for women even more so for Caucasian women, considered the lowest on the totem pole.