• http://www.spire2grow.com/ Mayurakshi Ghosh

    This is one of the most relevant and informative piece I read today. I completely agree that companies must understand where they stands. What kind of maturity and professionalism they would show to new hires. In order to identify, engage, influence and rope in new candidates, HR must first build a strong and effective pool of accurate JDs. This is one of the crucial factors for choosing right candidates with skill matching and experience relevancy. HR tech tools helps us simplify the recruitment process and thus employing contextual intelligence automation system delivers the right set of people saving time, cost and efforts? Isn’t it?

  • Tamer Rafla

    Thanks for the feedback Mayurakshi. Most recruitment organizations see tech as a replacement rather than an enabler. If your processes are broken, tech will not fix them. Manufacturing organizations fell into this trap in the early 2000s, when they sought to implement the latest ERP systems costing them several millions of dollars to optimize their supply chain. Little did they know that putting that “band aid” will make things worse. Nowadays, world-class manufacturing organizations go through the exercise of optimizing internal processes first (aka operational excellence) before putting any tech in place. Talent acquisition is following that same path.

    • http://www.spire2grow.com/ Mayurakshi Ghosh

      Definitely yes, however, I feel in this fast-paced era nothing depends on gut-feel or intuition but data-driven insights. Having said that companies should not be afraid to try technology just because few mishaps happened in the past?

  • Glenn Mandelkern

    Geometry class presents the realization that not all rectangles are squares yet all squares are rectangles. Similarly, not all candidates become hiring managers yet many hiring managers have been candidates, especially having been hired by that firm.

    It’d be interesting for hiring managers to diagnose the hiring process at their current place of employment using the 5 levels of this software development model. What do they think about the way they got hired? What level would they rate how their candidacy was treated? And now that they’re on the inside observing, what do they deem necessary to get their hiring process to a higher level if it’s not there already?

    It is important to do this because one thing hiring managers do get rated on is the quality of their hires. (At least by employers who view hiring as Serious Business.)

    • Tamer Rafla

      Great idea Glenn, thanks for sharing. Recruiting organizations are often too tangled up with the details that they miss low hanging fruits or obvious improvement infinitives. Hiring manager’s inputs (as an external stakeholder) would very valuable. Self assessment from a neutral party is the first in this maturity process.