Dr. John Sullivan

About the Author

DJS campus headshot

Dr. John Sullivan is an internationally known HR thought-leader from the Silicon Valley who specializes in providing bold and high-business impact; strategic Talent Management solutions. He’s a prolific author with over 900 articles and 10 books covering all areas of talent management. He has written over a dozen white papers, conducted over 50 webinars, dozens of workshops, and he has been featured in over 35 videos. He is an engaging corporate speaker who has excited audiences at over 300 corporations/ organizations in 30 countries on all six continents. His ideas have appeared in every major business source including the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, BusinessWeek, Fast Company, CFO, Inc., NY Times, SmartMoney, USA Today, HBR, and the Financial Times. In addition, he writes for the WSJ Experts column. He has been interviewed on CNN and the CBS and ABC nightly news, NPR, as well many local TV and radio outlets. Fast Company called him the "Michael Jordan of Hiring," Staffing.org called him “the father of HR metrics,” and SHRM called him “One of the industry's most respected strategists." He was selected among HR’s “Top 10 Leading Thinkers” and he was ranked No. 8 among the top 25 online influencers in talent management. He served as the Chief Talent Officer of Agilent Technologies, the HP spinoff with 43,000 employees, and he was the CEO of the Business Development Center, a minority business consulting firm in Bakersfield, California. He is currently a Professor of Management at San Francisco State (1982 – present). His articles can be found all over the Internet and on his popular website www.drjohnsullivan.com and on www.ERE.Net. He lives in Pacifica, California.

Candidate Research — The Critical Information That You Must Know About Your Recruiting Targets

target

It’s a sad fact that most of what we know about those who we are trying to hire (recruiting prospects and candidates) is anecdotal and historical. At the same time, both the job search process and candidate expectations are changing at an incredibly rapid rate. These changes are a result of the Internet, social…

A Dozen Good Reasons You Should be Cautious About Employee Happiness

Happy Millennials

First of two parts Ever since the Declaration of Independence, “the pursuit of happiness” has been a national goal. Only recently, however, has a more narrow focus on employee happiness become a talked about item among business and HR leaders. Some call it a trend, but I call it another distracting fad that…

Native Advertising — The Next Big Thing in Recruitment Advertising

native advertising

I have always encouraged recruiting leaders to borrow effective practices from the business side of the enterprise and to adapt them to the recruiting function. One current opportunity for borrowing is native advertising. This is a powerful product advertising approach that has proven to be highly effective in engaging Internet and mobile phone…

10 Outrageous, Attention-Grabbing Talent Management Practices

Outrageous

If you’re battling to recruit and retain top talent, you must have talent practices that go beyond the mundane in order to get their attention. And, if you expect to impress the even more valuable innovators or creative types, you must go further and do something truly bold to get their attention. In the Silicon…

Want Top-performing Hires? Learning Ability May Be The No. 1 Predictor

learning

Everyone involved in corporate recruiting knows that hiring managers value education because we routinely use it as an absolute requirement to screen in or screen out candidates for hiring. But unfortunately, both recruiters and hiring managers all too often focus exclusively on a single type of learning: formal education. This can lead to…

Google’s Rabbit Hole — Sourcing Top Talent Based On Their Search Words

rabbit hole

Editor’s note: This post, which was previously published on ERE, offers great insight into the sourcing and recruiting practices at Google. Google’s “rabbit hole” recruiting program simply has to be classified as innovative. The program has two major components. The first (a “keyword sourcing” approach) identifies employed top talent (some call them passives)…