July 25th, 2012

Former Unpaid Intern’s Lawsuit Gets Approval For Class Action Status

By John E. Thompson As we reported earlier, a former Harper’s Bazaar unpaid intern is pursuing a lawsuit against publisher the Hearst Corporation in which she claims (among other things) to have been an “employee” under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act who was not compensated in compliance with that law. A New…

Informatica Goes Big-Big-Big With a Little Careers Site Update

Informatica, multiple honoree of the ERE Recruiting Excellence Award, has launched a new careers site whose design isn’t full of bells and whistles, but whose verbiage touts Informatica’s “big data, big difference, big purpose.” It’s part of an ongoing relaunch, with more changes to come. The company, fighting hard to bring in hundreds…

Political Speech in the Workplace: Employers Beware

By D. Albert Brannen With a presidential election on the horizon, everyone seems to have strong opinions about the candidates and issues. Inevitably, these opinions will come up during conversations in the workplace. Not only could such conversations disrupt the workplace, but employers and employees could put themselves at legal risk if they…

Ask Barb: Screening Out Candidates

Dear Barb: I participate on your Wednesday live training calls and have heard you say, “When in doubt, send them out.” I wish the senior recruiters in my office listened more to your advice. They send their own candidates but always screen mine out. How do I convince my co-workers to send my…

Amazon Takes Over Homepage to Announce New Employee Program As It Gears Up To Hire Thousands

As Amazon prepares to open two, massive warehouse facilities in the next six months or so, the company took the unprecedented step of announcing a new employee benefit on its homepage. In a letter addressed to “customers,” CEO Jeff Bezos said Amazon would now pay up to $8,000 toward tuition and expenses for…

3 Lessons from the Olympics Security Debacle for Talent Acquisition Or . . . How Not to Embarrass Your Nation

As you may have heard, the company contracted to provide security guards to the London Olympics announced a scant three weeks before the event that — [psych! sorry!] — it was going to be (by some accounts) 7,000 guards short. This apparently caught nearly everyone, including the CEO of G4S (the largest security company in the world —…